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DC Exhibits We’re Thankful For & Other Artful Links

Michelangelo is at the Met — look out for a future blog post on this exhibit!

November is awash in cool exhibits to see in DC, whether you need a family activity for Thanksgiving weekend — or you just want to do something inside and pretend winter isn’t coming.

But before we get to the exhibits, there’s some …

Important art-world news

Today in “things that drive us a little batty,” Fiona Candlin conducted research into why visitors continue to touch artwork and other museum artifacts. We understand the urge, but stand by our motto: please don’t touch. (Atlas Obscura)

Insects, Butterflies, and a Grasshopper; black chalk, watercolor and gouache on parchment, by Jan van Kessel. 1664.

That being said, sometimes you just can’t help it — such was the case for an unfortunate wind-blown grasshopper who entered art history when it entered a Van Gogh back in 1889. The (small) insect has been stuck in thick impasto paint since then, and only discovered recently by a conservator. (NPR)

Our gallery rules therefore prohibit this painting from Art League shows, but perhaps we’d make an exception for Vincent:

Tidings 1975

Before we get to DC, we wanted to point out this Michelangelo exhibit is at the Met, which you need to go see during its three-month run. Why so short? The drawings on view are very light-sensitive. “Once the show’s done, the likelihood of there being another on its scale within the lifetime of anyone reading these words is slim.” (New York Times)

Exhibits around DC

Now the fun stuff:

The 10th annual FotoWeek DC is here for all you photography fans. Even if you missed the opening weekend, there’s still plenty going on through November 19. (various locations)

We’re excited to check out the next ARTECHOUSE exhibit, Kingdom of Colors. This is a 270-degree video installation by Thomas Blanchard and Oilhack previewed in the video above. If the style looks familiar, you may have seen the new iPhone X commercial! (ARTECHOUSE, through November 26, timed tickets from $15)

If you’re like us, you want to work some art into your holiday shopping. How about this text-based mural by Yoko Ono at Union Market? It’s a good reminder any time. (Union Market)

Prediction: there will be no timed tickets or enormous crowds, but the Hirshhorn has its next great exhibit lined up with Mark Bradford’s 2017 work, Pickett’s Charge. Inspired by a 19th century cyclorama, this partially abstract work explores the turning point of the Civil War over eight massive paintings and 400 feet. (Hirshhorn, through November 2018)

On a less contemporary note, there’s a new Vermeer exhibit at the National Gallery. “Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry” explores genre painting — scenes from everyday life. (National Gallery of Art, through January 21)

https://twitter.com/megluku/status/930067201205383169

Jumping forward a couple hundred years: you’ve likely seen Luncheon of the Boating Party at the Phillips. That landmark Renoir is now the starting point for a new exhibit, “Renoir and Friends.” We haven’t seen the exhibit yet, but the headline for the Washington Post review is “Another Renoir show? But this one is worth it.” (Phillips Collection, through January 7, $12 admission)

Finally, The Art League has three exhibits on view, free as always. (The Art League, through December 3)

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