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Mary Ann Stevens Memorial Exhibit

Celebrating the Life and Work of Mary Ann Stevens

Please join us to celebrate the life and work of Mary Ann Stevens, long time Art League member and Torpedo Factory Artist. Her family has generously made a gift of her work that will be on view and available for purchase, with all proceeds supporting the arts programming and operation of The Art League.
On View: Saturday, June 1, 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Reception: Sunday, June 2, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm



 

More about Mary Ann Stevens

Mary Ann Stevens was born on November 26, 1928 in Memphis Tennessee. She was the oldest of six children in a large Italian family. Mary Ann left Memphis at age 24 for Washington DC where she worked in the Navy Building. It was in Washington DC where she met Marvin (Steve) Stevens on a blind date. They were married in 1954 and had two daughters. They traveled the United States with the USMC and it was while living in Hawaii that Mary Ann was inspired to begin painting. She was a founding member of the Torpedo Factory Art Center where she maintained a studio for more than 40 years. Her work is in collections around the world including “Virginia Artists: Juror’s Choice” at the Virginia Museum in Richmond and the 157th Annual Exhibition at the National Academy of Design in New York, and often at The Art League Gallery and the Target Gallery.


Mary Ann Steven’s Work

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